• Length:
    4 Weeks
  • Effort:
    4–6 hours per week
  • Institution
  • Subject:
  • Level:
    Introductory
  • Language:
    English
  • Video Transcript:
    English
  • Course Type:
    Instructor-led on a course schedule

Prerequisites

Knowledge of librarianship and library services is recommended, but not required.

About this course

Skip About this course

How can we strengthen libraries and librarians in the advancement of knowledge, creativity, and literacy in the 21st century? Though libraries have been loved for over 3,600 years, their relevance in the digital age is being questioned, and their economic and social impacts are poorly understood. What is really essential about libraries and librarians, today and tomorrow? How can library members and all who support the mission of 21st-century librarianship raise the profile and support of these timeless values and services, and ensure universal access to the universe of ideas in all our communities? This course is based on what works. We’ll take an inspired, strategic, evidence-based approach to advocacy for the future of strong communities – cities, villages, universities and colleges, research and development centres, businesses, and not-for-profits.

We will cover:

  • Values and transformative impacts of libraries and librarianship
  • Research on current perceptions of libraries and librarians
  • Role of relationships in advocacy
  • Principles of influence and their impact on advocacy
  • Strategic thinking and planning in advocacy
  • Effective communication: messages, messengers, and timing

Guest speakers share their ideas, recommendations and successes. These leading advocates include, among others:

  • Barbara Band, Emmbrook School, Berkshire
  • Cathy De Rosa, OCLC
  • Ken Haycock, University of Southern California
  • Joe Janes, University of Washington
  • Nancy Kranich, Rutgers University
  • Victoria Owen, University of Toronto
  • John Szabo, Los Angeles Public Library

Previous participants have said that this course – “showed me the value of building relationships,” and “made me approach our library’s advocacy much differently”, and “helped me see advocacy in a new light."

Advocacy is growing in urgency and importance on the agenda of all library associations. In this highly competitive environment, associations help their members and their communities to build advocacy capacity. This course meets that strategic need. It is offered in partnership with the Canadian Library Association and the American Library Association.

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For the full description, please see the syllabus at:
http://courses.edx.org/c4x/University_of_TorontoX/LA101x_2/asset/LA101X__2015__Syllabus.docx

What you'll learn

Skip What you'll learn
  • Acquire insights on your own motivations, reflect on the principles of librarianship, and identify what’s at stake for libraries
  • Employ key research relevant to advocacy for libraries: evidence on perceptions of libraries; values and assumptions of decision makers; and the dynamics of influence
  • Consider and apply ways to exert influence and engage others
  • Adopt a strategic perspective in planning for your advocacy
  • Communicate more effectively, and develop and strengthen strategic relationships
  • Plan and apply best practice to move an advocacy objective forward
     

Meet your instructors

Wendy Newman
Senior Fellow and Lecturer, Faculty of Information
University of Toronto
Gwen Harris
Instructional Designer
Carolyn Dineen
Student, Master of Information Program
University of Toronto