News & Announcements

Harvard Online Venture EdX Grows to 27 Universities Adding Asia

Bloomberg 21 May 2013 By Oliver Stanley
EdX, the online education consortium founded by Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has expanded to add 15 universities, including schools in China, Korea and Japan. Read more about Bloomberg | Harvard Online Venture EdX Grows to 27 Universities Adding Asia

See change: UQ joins online revolution

The Australian 21 May 2013 By Julie Hare
It's a logical step, then, to put your hand up to run a massive open online course when the opportunity arises. And that's happened today with the announcement that the University of Queensland has joined EdX, the exclusive Harvard-MIT online learning platform. Read more about The Australian | See change: UQ joins online revolution

EdX adds 15 schools, several from Asia

The Washington Post 21 May 2013 By Nick Anderson
The race to enlist the world’s universities in the movement for free online education accelerated Tuesday as the Web site edX announced that it has added 15 new schools, more than doubling the size of the venture, with new partners from Asia, Europe and Australia. Read more about The Washington Post | EdX adds 15 schools, several from Asia

LAPTOP U

The New Yorker 20 May 2013 By Nathan Heller
Gregory Nagy, a professor of classical Greek literature at Harvard, is a gentle academic of the sort who, asked about the future, will begin speaking of Homer and the battles of the distant past. Read more about The New Yorker | LAPTOP U

A classroom for the whole world

The Boston Globe 19 May 2013 By Cindy Atoji Keene
TEACHERS OFTEN WORRY about the size of their classes. Anant Agarwal was surpised and thrilled that nearly 155,000 students enrolled for a course he taught last year. Read more about The Boston Globe | A classroom for the whole world

EdX turns 1: Now what?

The Washington Post 2 May 2013 By Nick Anderson
Across the country, thousands of college biology instructors give lectures every year on the fundamental biochemical process of breaking down sugar, known as glycolysis. Are all those lectures necessary? Might a few suffice? Read more about The Washington Post | EdX turns 1: Now what?

College is Free!

CNN 30 Apr 2013 By Kim Clark
Two things about higher education have become clear. First, your children need it more than ever to stay competitive -- and so might you, if you need to upgrade for a fast-changing job market. Second, the model colleges use to deliver that education is broken. Rising tuition, high student debt, and stingier funding for public colleges are making it more difficult for families to keep up. Read more about CNN | College is Free!

Colleges Adapt Online Courses to Ease Burden

The New York Times 29 Apr 2013 By Tamar Lewin
SAN JOSE, Calif. — Dazzled by the potential of free online college classes, educators are now turning to the gritty task of harnessing online materials to meet the toughest challenges in American higher education: giving more students access to college, and helping them graduate on time. Read more about The New York Times | Colleges Adapt Online Courses to Ease Burden

Adapting to Blended Courses, and Finding Early Benefits

The New York Times 29 Apr 2013 By Tamar Lewin
BOSTON — At Bunker Hill Community College, students worked in small groups, writing step-by-step instructions for making a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. But when a classmate was assigned to follow their instructions as literally as possible, it became clear that removing the bread from its bag was an important, forgotten step. Read more about The New York Times | Adapting to Blended Courses, and Finding Early Benefits

Learning from the world

The Hindu 26 Apr 2013 By Esther Elias
On a Spring day in September 2012, Anant Agarwal, a professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology taught Circuits and Electronics. Unlike his typical class of small numbers, 1,55,000 students across the world tuned in to take notes. It was the beginning of Edx — Harvard and MIT's online initiative to take top-class education beyond physical barriers. Today, self-directed learners worldwide are acquiring knowledge of everything from differential equations to art history, taught by the world’s best educators. Read more about The Hindu | Learning from the world

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