CaltechX: Ec1011x: Principles of Economics with Calculus

School: CaltechX
Course Code: Ec1011x
Classes Start: 7 Jan 2014
Course Length: 10 weeks
Estimated effort: 9 hours per week

Prerequisites:

Good understanding of basic (univariate) calculus.

CaltechX: Ec1011x - Principles of Economics with Calculus

Principles of Economics with Calculus

Quantitative and model-based introduction to basic ideas in economics, and applications to a wide range of real world problems.

About this Course

This course provides a quantitative and model-based introduction to basic economic principles, and teaches how to apply them to make sense of a wide range of real world problems. Examples of applications include predicting the impact of technological changes in market prices, calculating the optimal gasoline tax, and measuring the value of new products. This is a real Caltech class. It will be taught concurrently to Caltech and on-line students. This has two implications. On the costs side: the class is challenging, makes extensive use of calculus, and will demand significant effort. On the benefit side: successful completion of the class will provide you with an in-depth understanding of basic economics, and will permanently change the way you see the world.

Ways to take this edX course:

Simply Audit this Course

Audit this course for free and have complete access to all of the course material, tests, and the online discussion forum. You decide what and how much you want to do.

or

Try for a Certificate

Looking to test your mettle? Participate in all of the course's activities and abide by the edX Honor Code. If your work is satisfactory, you'll receive a personalized certificate to showcase your achievement.

Course Staff

  • Antonio Rangel

    Antonio Rangel

    Antonio is the Bing Professor of Neuroscience, Behavioral Biology and Economics at Caltech. His laboratory studies the computational and neurobiological basis of simple choice (e.g., apple or orange?), self-control problems (e.g., apple or cake?) and altruistic behavior (e.g., new car or charity?). He is passionate about teaching principles of economics, which he has done since his graduate student days.

  • Liam Clegg

    Liam Clegg is a third year PhD student at Caltech, studying behavioral economics and game theory. He fell in love with the economist's way of thinking after taking an introductory economics course over a decade ago. He is usually overdressed.

Prerequisites

Good understanding of basic (univariate) calculus.