• Length:
    4 Weeks
  • Effort:
    1–2 hours per week
  • Price:
    $250 USD
  • Institution
  • Subject:
  • Level:
    Introductory
  • Language:
    English
  • Video Transcript:
    English
  • Course Type:
    Self-paced on your time

Associated Programs:

Prerequisites

● Basic MS Excel skills

● Some familiarity with financial instruments and markets

● Elementary probability theory

About this course

Skip About this course
  • In this course, we’ll look at the various methods for conducting DCF valuations (no growth, constant growth and variable growth), source of input values and when each is appropriate.

  • We’ll explain the rationale for using free cash flows versus other measures of net resource flows (e.g. dividends, earnings, EBITDA, etc.) when valuing a firm or its common equity. We’ll also learn how to calculate free cash flow (to the firm and to the equity holders) using information from corporate financial statements

  • Next, we’ll discuss the factors that would need to be factored into a free cash flow projection for a DCF valuation, including but not limited to issues impacting sales growth, margins (net and operating) and leverage (operating and financial).

  • We’ll also cover the macroeconomic, industry sector and company-specific factors that color the context for cash flow projections (e.g. industry/product lifecycle or competitive analysis).

  • Next, we’ll learn how to calculate a terminal value for a DCF valuation and discuss issues regarding the sensitivity of a terminal value to assumed growth and discount rates as well as a factor related to the determination of reasonable estimates for those inputs.

  • We’ll also learn how to calculate the value of a firm and the value of its equity using DCF analysis given the appropriate free cash flow projections and discount rates.

  • Next, we’ll discuss alternative methods for determining enterprise value and equity value based on either excess cash and non-operating assets or economic profit and invested capital.

  • We’ll wrap up this course with a look at the components of the widely used valuation ratios and how they are employed in assessing relative value.

This course is part 3 of the New York Institute of Finance’s Corporate Finance & Valuation Methods Professional Certificate.

What you'll learn

Skip What you'll learn
  • Overview of Discounted Cash Flow Methodologies
  • Elements of Cash Flow Projections
  • Discounted Cash Flow Analysis
  • Alternate Valuation Methodologies
  • Relative Valuation Techniques

Meet your instructors

Douglas Carroll
Instructor
New York Institute of Finance