• Length:
    6 Weeks
  • Effort:
    4–6 hours per week
  • Price:

    FREE
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  • Institution
  • Subject:
  • Level:
    Intermediate
  • Language:
    English
  • Video Transcript:
    English

Prerequisites

Secondary school (high school) algebra and trigonometry. Calculus is needed but can be learned concurrently.

About this course

Learn the physics of how things move with this calculus-based course in Mechanics! PHYS101x serves as an introduction to mechanics following a standard first semester university physics course. This course teaches fundamental concepts and mathematical problem solving required for all STEM fields. It serves learners as valuable preparation for the equivalent on-campus course, or as supplementary material.

Part 1 covers translational motion:
Kinematics
Newton’s Laws of Motion
Conservation of Energy
Momentum and Collisions

Part 2 continues with rotational motion.
Rotational Motion
Angular Momentum
Statics and Elasticity
Universal Gravitation

What you'll learn

Rotational Motion, Angular Momentum, Statics and Elasticity, Gravitation, How to apply vector analysis and calculus to solve physics problems

Meet your instructors

Jason Hafner
Professor of Physics, Astronomy and Chemistry
Rice University

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Learner testimonials

“Best physics course I have ever taken. Intuitive, yet rigorous coverage of all materials. Homework difficulty was just right and fills any gap in concepts.”

--PHYS102x student