• Length:
    1 Weeks
  • Effort:
    2–3 hours per week
  • Institution
  • Subject:
  • Level:
    Advanced
  • Language:
    English
  • Video Transcript:
    English

About this course

Skip About this course

Overview

Internet Enduring Material Jointly Provided by Stanford University School of Medicine (CME) and University of Rhode Island College of Pharmacy. Presented by The Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine

Antibiotic misuse is widespread and has dire patient and public health consequences. National organizations, including the CDC and the Joint Commission, advocate for a formal “Antibiotic Timeout” to reassess empiric antibiotics 48-72 hours after their initiation. During this Timeout, clinicians should answer the following questions: Does the patient have an infection that will respond to antibiotics? If so, is the patient on the right antibiotic(s) and is it being administered in the correct dose and by the correct route and (in the case of intravenous therapy) duration of infusion? Can a more targeted antibiotic regimen be used to treat the infection (i.e., de-escalation)? For how long should the antibiotic(s) be administered?

This CME activity provides a practical approach to performing “Antibiotic Timeouts” in the inpatient setting. Using short, didactic sessions, we will provide examples on how to reassess antibiotic therapy started empirically using clinical, laboratory, and microbiological data. The majority of this CME will be high-yield, interactive inpatient cases covering skin and soft tissue infections, pneumonia, catheter-associated urinary tract infections, and neutropenic fever, that illustrate the timeout process and the principles of appropriate use of antimicrobials.

Intended Audience

This course is designed to meet the educational needs of physicians from a wide variety of specialties including cardiology, critical care, family practice, general surgery, hospitalists, infectious diseases, internal medicine, neurology, oncology, pediatrics, and urology, as well as pharmacists, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants.

Accreditation

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 2.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

If you would like to earn CME credit from Stanford University School of Medicine for participating in this course, please review the information here prior to beginning the activity.

Additional Instructors

Emily Mui, PharmD, BCPS
Katherine E. Fleming-Dutra, MD
Lauri Hicks, DO

What you'll learn

Skip What you'll learn
  • Describe the principles and shortcomings of empiric antibiotic therapy.
  • Routinely conduct all steps of the antibiotic timeout, in accordance with CDC guidelines on antibiotic stewardship

Meet your instructors

Stan Deresinski
Clinical Professor of Medicine
Stanford University
Marisa Holubar
Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine
Stanford University School of Medicine
Elizabeth Robilotti
Associate Director, Infection Control Program
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY
Lina Meng
Antimicrobial Stewardship Pharmacist
Stanford Hospital and Clinics

Who can take this course?

Unfortunately, learners from one or more of the following countries or regions will not be able to register for this course: Iran, Cuba and the Crimea region of Ukraine. While edX has sought licenses from the U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) to offer our courses to learners in these countries and regions, the licenses we have received are not broad enough to allow us to offer this course in all locations. EdX truly regrets that U.S. sanctions prevent us from offering all of our courses to everyone, no matter where they live.